Top tips to Write A Persuasive Essay

Writing a persuasive essay is similar to having a lawyer argue in a case before a jury. The author takes a stand on an issue- either “for” or “against” – and makes the strongest possible argument to win over the reader and get analysis essay help.

The writer’s goal in a persuasive essay is to convince the reader to accept a specific point of view or take a specific action. Great research, awareness of the readers’ basis, and a strong understanding of both sides of the issue are all required in persuasive essays. A good convincing essay shows why the author’s point of view is correct and why the opponent’s point of view is incorrect.

Advertising, newspaper editorials, blogs, and political speeches are all examples of persuasive writing. “The school board is arguing whether or not to ban cell phone use in school,” for example, are a common persuasive writing assignment and test prompt. Write an essay persuading the board to support your viewpoint.” The main goal of persuasive writing, as demonstrated in this prompt, is to “persuade” or “convince” an audience (the school board) to think or act in a certain way.

The Persuasive Essay Writing Process in Five Steps

We think that the five-step writing process is the most effective way to learn how to write a persuasive essay. Here are some persuasive essay writing tips for each stage of the process.

Prewriting for the Persuasive Essay

The prewriting stage of composing a persuasive essay is important. Students should plan any aspect of the essay during this phase:

Choose a position: Students should consider the issue and decide which side they want to support.

Understand the audience: To write an effective persuasive essay, the writer must first understand the reader’s viewpoint. Is the reader undecided or leaning toward one of the two sides?

Do the research: The foundation of a persuasive essay is solid, convincing evidence. Don’t rely solely on one source. Gather data from a variety of websites and reference documents. Consult with local experts and teachers. Take notes as you read. There is no substitute for understanding both sides of an argument.

Identify the most convincing evidence: as well as the most important points for the opposing viewpoint.

Organizing the Persuasive Essay: Outline and Structure

Create an outline after that. Organize the evidence to create the most powerful argument possible. If your teacher has shown you an essay structure, include it in your outline. A persuasive essay usually consists of five or six paragraphs:

Persuasive Essay Outline

Introductory Paragraph

  • Use a “hook” to pique the reader’s interest.
  • Give a high-level overview of the debate.
  • Finish with a thesis statement that demonstrates the argument’s position.

Body Paragraphs

  • Each paragraph in the body should concentrate on a single piece of evidence.
  • Provide adequate supporting detail within each paragraph.

Opposing View Paragraph

  • Describe and then refute the opposing viewpoint’s main points.

Concluding Paragraph

  • Restate and reaffirm the thesis as well as the supporting evidence.

Drafting the Persuasive Essay

Consider the following recommendations when writing the first drafts of a persuasive essay:

  • The first paragraph should contain a solid “hook” that draws the reader in. Start with a surprising fact or statistic, a question or quote, or a strong statement. “Driving while talking on a cell phone, even hands-free, is the same as driving drunk,” says one expert and also gets analytical essay help.
  • The thesis statement should make it clear what the writer’s point of view is.
  • Each body paragraph should address a different point, and each paragraph’s sentences should provide solid evidence in the form of facts, statistics, expert quotes, and real-life examples.
  • Consider using an analogy, making comparisons, or illustrating a hypothetical scenario (e.g., what if, suppose that…).
  • Don’t presume the crowd is well-versed in the subject. Define terms and provide context information.
  • The final paragraph should summarise the most relevant evidence and urge the reader to take action or adopt the position. A dramatic plea, a forecast that means immediate action is required, a question that prompts readers to think critically about the problem, or a suggestion that gives readers specific ideas on what they can do can all be used in the closing sentence.

Revising the Persuasive Essay

Students review, revise, and reorganize their work during the revision period to make it the best possible. Keep the following points in mind:

  • Does the essay take a strong stance on the subject, backed up with related facts, statistics, quotes, and examples?
  • Is there an effective “hook” at the start of the essay that draws readers in and keeps them reading?
  • Is there compelling evidence in each paragraph that focuses on a single supporting point?
  • Is the counter-argument submitted and convincingly refuted?
  • Is there a variety of sentence structures? Is the word selection accurate? Is it possible that the transitions between sentences and paragraphs aid the reader’s comprehension?
  • Is the writer’s position valued in the concluding paragraph, and does it compel the reader to think and act?

Take another look at the thesis if the essay is still falling short. Is it the most persuasive argument? Write a thesis statement for the opposing perspective to test it. Is it necessary to reinforce the original thesis in comparison? The rest of the essay should fall into place more easily once the thesis provides a well-built argument with a clear adversarial perspective.

Editing the Persuasive Essay

After that, proofread for grammar and mechanics errors, and edit to increase style and clarity. Having a friend read the essay gives the writer a new view while editing.

Publishing the Persuasive Essay

It can be exciting and daunting to share a convincing essay with the rest of the class or with family and friends. Learn from your mistakes and use the feedback to improve your next essay.